Culture of Polis, Year XVIII (2021), Issue 44, pp. 99–109
ISSN 1820-4589

MARIJANA MLADENOV
Faculty of Law for Commerce and Judicary in Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia
alavuk@pravni-fakultet.info

JELENA STOJŠIĆ DABETIĆ
Faculty of Law for Commerce and Judicary in Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia
j.stojsic.dabetic@pravni-fakultet.info

UDC: 343.2:341.1/.8
https://doi.org/10.51738/Kpolisa2021.18.1r.2.04

Review work
Received: 2021-01-05
Approved: 2021-01-28
Online: 2021-03-08

PDF
AŽURIRANJE „PRAVA DA SE BUDE ZABORAVLJEN” KAO PRINCIPA ZAŠTITE PODATAKA U EVROPSKOJ UNIJI
AN UPDATE ON THE RIGHT TO BE FORGOTTEN AS A PRINCIPLE OF PERSONAL DATA PROTECTION IN EUROPEAN UNION

SUMMARY
Should we consider the right to be forgotten as a threat to free speech or the mechanism of the right to privacy? This most controversial element of the right to privacy and personal data protection caused the global debate on privacy and freedom of speech. Despite the fact that the right to be forgotten is codified in Article 17 of the General Data Protection Regulation and that fundamental postulates of this right were defined in Google v. Spain, there still remain unresolved issues. In order to gain a clear idea of the content of the right to be forgotten, as the principle of data protection in accordance with the latest European perspective, the subject matter of the paper refers to analyses of the developments of this right in the light of relevant regulations, as well as of the jurisprudence of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). The article firstly provides an overview of the concept of the right to be forgotten, from the very early proposals that gave rise to it, to the latest ones contained in recent regulations. Furthermore, the special attention is devoted to the new standards of the concept of the right to be forgotten from the aspect of recent rulings of the CJEU, GC et al v. CNIL and CNIL v. Google. Within the concluding remarks, the authors highlight the need for theoretical innovation and an adequate legal framework of the right to be forgotten in order to fit this right within the sociotechnical legal culture. The goal of the article is to provide insight regarding the implementation of the right to be forgotten in the European Union and to identify the main challenges with respect to the issue.
KEYWORDS
right to be forgotten, personal data protection, European regulation, jurisprudence of the CJEU

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